View Polk County Map
  Find A Record
  Contact Information
  Resource Links
  Master Polk County
  Burial Search
Whiteaker Cemetery ~ Lucy Louise Whiteaker ~ part of the Polk County Pioneer Cemeteries of Oregon
Print Friendly Version
Lucy Louise Whiteaker
MAIDEN NAME: Titus AKA 1:  AKA 2:  AKA 3: 
BORN: 20 Mar 1844 DIED: 21 Jul 1925 BURIED: 23 Jul 1925 (Whiteaker Cemetery)
BIRTH PLACE:  La Porte Co., Indiana
DEATH PLACE: Eltopia, Franklin Co., Washington
Name of father James L. Titus
Maiden name of mother Mercy Barnes
DEATH -  Lucy L. Whiteaker, d. 21 Jul 1925 in Eltopia, Franklin Co., Washington, at the age of 81 years. Name of father J. L. Titys [Titus], maiden name of mother Mersey [Mercy] Barnes.
(Source - Washington State Digital Archives, Death Records)
1850 IN CENSUS - Lucy L. Titus, age 6, b. Indiana, is enumerated with James Titus, age 30, occupation farmer, b. Canada, and Mercy, age 24, b. Canada.  Also enumerated with the family are Lucy Barnes, age 52, b. Canada, Nancy Barnes, age 19, b. Michigan, and Leepman Barnes, age 12, b. Indiana.
MARRIAGE - David J. Whiteaker to Lucy L. Titus on 19 Mar 1871 in Walla Walla Co., Washington. 
(Source - Washington State Digital Archives, Marriage Records)
1920 WA CENSUS - Lucy L. Whiteaker, age 75, widowed, b. Indiana.
Mrs. Louise L. Whiteaker, widow of David Whiteaker and one of the pioneer settlers of Polk county, died at the home of her niece in Eltopia, Washington, Tuesday, July 21. Her remains were brought to Independence where funeral services were held in the Methodist church yesterday forenoon at 11 o’clock. Burial was in the Whiteaker cemetery north of Monmouth. Her husband was a kinsman of John Whiteaker the first governor of Oregon after it was admitted to the union as a state. He held office from March 3, 1859, to September 10, 1862. 
David Whiteaker farmed it on the place now occupied by the Rineys but moved to Independence and lived there half a century. A short time ago she went to live with the niece in Eltopia. Mrs. Whiteaker was an ardent temperance worker, was a charter member of the Independence W.C.T.U. and was a member of the Methodist church. 
Monmouth Herald, Friday, 24 Jul 1925, 1:3

Mrs Lucy Luvica Whiteaker, affectionately known as “Aunt Lou,” died at the home of her niece, Mrs. Emma Johnson, at Eltopia, Wash, July 21, She had been ill for a long time, going from here to Eltopia several months ago in order to be with relatives during her final illness. 
Mrs. Whiteaker was exceedingly active in church and teperance circles for many years, and has been proclaimed the “mother of prohibition in Polk county.” 
Mrs. Whiteaker was born March 20, 1844, at La Port, Indiana, a daughter of James L. and Mercy Titus. She was married to David J. Whiteaker at Waitsburg, Wash, March 19, 1871. Shortly afterward they came to Polk county in the company of Mr. Whiteaker’s two brothers, George and Ben Whiteaker, all three acquiring farms a few miles north of Monmouth on what is now the Pacific highway. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whiteaker made their home on the ranch until about 22 years ago, when they moved to Talmage. Mr. Whiteaker died about 17 or 18 years ago as the result of injuries sustained by being thrown from a wagon. Mrs. Whiteaker came to Independence to reside from Talmage and became more deeply involved than ever in her church and temperance work. 
For many years Mrs. Whiteaker directed the affairs of the Loyal Temperance Legion, interesting boys and girls of tender age in the project, impressing upon them a lasting lesson in the right way of living. The legion met every Sunday afternoon in the Methodist church and nothing but an extraordinary cause kept Aunt Lou from being there to lead the organization in its mission. She continued with it until illness finally forced her to relinquish the work but a few months ago. 
Funeral services were held at the Methodist church here July 23 at 11 o’clock in the morning. Rev J.S. Green of Sheridan, a former pastor of the church, assisted by Rev F.C. Becker, officiated. He eulogized the sacrificing life which Mrs Whiteaker had led in order to carry out her fixed purpose of accomplishment – a rock of righteousness and tenderness. Burial was made in a private plot on what is known as the Ben Whiteaker ranch and where she spent many years of her life. The pall bearers were W.G. Grant, Charles Smiley, Peter Ingermanson, Peter Kurre, Burris Estes and J.W. Kelley. There was a profusion of beautiful flowers – the offerings of loving hands – and symbolic of the love and veneration in which Aunt Lou was hald. She had no children but took three children of a sister, now Mrs. Emma Johnson, J.L. and Frank Coquillette, and cared for them to maturity with loving kindness. Mrs. Nancy Whiteaker is a sister-in-law and Mrs E.E. Tripp is a niece. There are also other relatives. 
Independence Enterprise, Friday, 24 Jul 1925, 1:1
Lucy L. His Wife
1844 - [1925]
(shares marker with husband David)

Branigar Survey
Saucy Survey & Photographs
Washington State Digital Archives
1850 IN CENSUS (La Porte Co., Cass, FA #25)
1920 WA CENSUS (Grays Harbor Co., Montesana, ED97, sheet 1A)
IE 24 July 1925, 1:1
MH 24 July 1925, 1:3


Home |  Find a Record |  Directions |  Contact Information |  History |  Sources |  Resource Links |  Polk County Map